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  • Publication Date: 04-2003
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: The National Academy of Public Administration
  • Abstract: This might well have been the greeting card on the desk of the nation's first Secretary of Homeland Security: Officially launched January 24, 2003 with 180,000 employees and a budget of nearly $40 billion, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is, at its inception, the third largest cabinet agency in the U.S. government. No U.S. government reorganization of this magnitude has been accomplished since the creation of the Department of Defense following World War II.
  • Topic: Security, Defense Policy, Government, Industrial Policy
  • Political Geography: United States
  • Author: Don Kettl, Peter Harkness, Lisa Heinzerling, DeWitt John, Howard M. Messner, Robert Terrell, Christophe Tulou, Alfred M. Zuck
  • Publication Date: 04-2003
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: The National Academy of Public Administration
  • Abstract: The New Source Review program (NSR) is a critic al tool enacted by Congress 25 years ago to protect public health and improve the nation's air quality. But, as applied to existing facilities, NSR is not working as Congress intended. Thus NSR should be fundamentally reformed and strongly enforced against past violations by existing facilities.
  • Topic: Environment, Government, Industrial Policy
  • Political Geography: United States
  • Author: Camille Cates Barnett, Christine Becker, Peter Goldberg, Sandra J. Hale, Sara E. Melendez, Michael Rogers
  • Publication Date: 04-2003
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: The National Academy of Public Administration
  • Abstract: A high-performance partnership is a mutually beneficial and reciprocal relationship among entities that share responsibilities, authority, and accountability for results. The partnership is high performance when it achieves goals and outcomes that are meaningful and could not be reached by an individual partner alone.
  • Topic: Civil Society, Government, Industrial Policy, International Organization
  • Author: Terry F. Buss, Stevens F. Redburn
  • Publication Date: 03-2003
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: The National Academy of Public Administration
  • Abstract: Changes in society and emerging technologies offer new possibilities for meaningful citizen participation in public choices. A new set of computer-based processes will support sophisticated and game -like group decision-making. Advanced software design accompanied by sensitivity to the hum an/machine interactions that must be managed can lead to citizen-friendly software products and processes that ordinary people can use both individually and in a group setting to make complex choices.
  • Topic: Democratization, Government, Science and Technology
  • Political Geography: United States
  • Author: Ivelaw L. Griffith
  • Publication Date: 09-2003
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: The North-South Center, University of Miami
  • Abstract: The two epigraphs — one by a noted scholar and erstwhile policyactor and the other by a respected policymaker with intellectual acumen — capture core elements of the twin realities of continuity and change that define the security scenario of the contemporary Caribbean. Proximity, vulnerability, and instability are not new features of the Caribbean or of Caribbean-United States dynamics; they represent some of the continuity from times past. However, they assume special character because of the terrorism tragedy that has “cast a pall across the whole hemisphere,” to quote Barbados Prime Minister Arthur.
  • Topic: Security, Terrorism
  • Political Geography: United States, Latin America, Caribbean, North America
  • Author: Jerry Haar, Catherine Leroy-Beltrán, Oscar Beltrán
  • Publication Date: 04-2003
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: The North-South Center, University of Miami
  • Abstract: Despite compelling evidence that, for the most part , benefits from the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) have exceeded its costs in the United States, Canada, and Mexico, the policy debate continues in all three countries as to whether the accord has produced more “winners” or “losers.” In the case of Mexico, the focus country of this research project, both the Institutional Revolutionary Party (Partido Revolucionario Institucional — PRI) and the National Action Party (Partido Acción Nacional — PAN) have been supportive of NAFTA.
  • Topic: Economics, Industrial Policy, International Trade and Finance
  • Political Geography: United States, Canada, North America, Mexico
  • Author: Thomas Andrew O'Keefe
  • Publication Date: 02-2003
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: The North-South Center, University of Miami
  • Abstract: Almost from the day it was launched on March 26, 1991, skeptics have predicted the imminent collapse of the Common Market of the South (Mercado Común del Sur — MERCOSUR), while some economists have fretted about the project's supposed protectionist designs to create a trade fortress. The most memorable example of the latter was a 1996 report written by a World Bank economist that relied on out-of-date trade statistics and attributed to MERCOSUR policies that were actually pre-existing national automotive regimes. More recent tirades have tried to blame Argentina's economic meltdown on its MERCOSUR membership. A well-known economist from a New York City investment bank has even gone as far as to proclaim MERCOSUR dead. Given all the invective directed against efforts to integrate South America's Southern Cone economically over the past decade, it is not surprising that MERCOSUR is misunderstood by many in North America.
  • Topic: Economics, International Trade and Finance, Treaties and Agreements
  • Political Geography: South America, Latin America, North America
  • Author: Jerry Haar
  • Publication Date: 07-2003
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: The North-South Center, University of Miami
  • Abstract: The Latin American financial services sector has been profoundly affected by the sweeping economic, legal, and regulatory reforms of the 1990s. Conversely, the sector has extensively impacted the economic liberalization process that has been the hallmark of Latin American development from the late 1980s through the present. This paper highlights trends in the financial services sector; discusses the key drivers of change, both globally and regionally; illustrates how three of those drivers — mergers and acquisitions (M), technology, and customer demand — are revolutionizing this sector; and reviews the organizational and strategic responses by financial firms to an increasingly competitive environment.
  • Topic: Economics, Emerging Markets, Globalization
  • Political Geography: Latin America
  • Author: Adam Isacson
  • Publication Date: 03-2003
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: The North-South Center, University of Miami
  • Abstract: Colombians had never seen President Andrés Pastrana as angry or as dejected as he appeared on television the night of Wednesday, February 20, 2002. His effort to end nearly 40 years of violence — a conflict with leftist guerrillas and paramilitary vigilantes that claimed over 3,500 lives in 2001 — had just received a fatal blow. More than three years of frustrating negotiations had come to nothing.
  • Topic: Conflict Resolution, Terrorism
  • Political Geography: Colombia
  • Author: Gabriel Marcella
  • Publication Date: 03-2003
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: The North-South Center, University of Miami
  • Abstract: President Bush's sweeping support for Colombia underlines a remarkable turnaround in U.S. policy. Driven for years by the ambiguity of a counternarcotics-only approach, the United States has now adopted a more comprehensive recognition of Colombia's deeply rooted and complex security problem. Indeed, Colombia is a revealing paradigm for twenty-first century conflict. It is a surprisingly weak state under assault by a powerful combination of ungoverned national territory, insurgent terrorism of the left and right, international crime organized around drug trafficking, a deeply rooted counterculture of violence and impunity, ecological damage, and institutional corruption. Unlike the Cold War military and ideological confrontation between two superpowers, a country's debilities, rather than its strengths, breed the viruses that threaten the international community and the United State.
  • Topic: Foreign Policy
  • Political Geography: United States, Colombia