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  • Author: Wolfgang Wagner
  • Publication Date: 09-2007
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Institute of European Studies
  • Abstract: Since EU members have agreed to establish integrated military forces and to decide jointly on their deployment in European institutions, the EU's “democratic deficit” is no longer confined to issues of common market governance but also includes foreign, security and defense politics. Drawing on recent debates in peace and conflict research, I will argue that a democratic deficit in European security and defense politics is not only worrying for its own sake but also because a growing body of literature regards the democratic control of security and defense politics as the best guarantee to maintain peaceful and cooperative relations with other states.
  • Topic: Security, International Organization, International Political Economy, International Security
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Author: Laurie Nathan
  • Publication Date: 05-2007
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Global Facilitation Network for Security Sector Reform
  • Abstract: Experience shows that reform processes will not succeed in the absence of commitment and ownership on the part of those undertaking reforms. Assistance should be designed to support partner governments and stakeholders as they move down a path of reform, rather than determining that path and leading them down it. A major problem in the area of security system reform in some regions, particularly in Africa, has been a lack of local input to and ownership of the emerging reform agenda. This issue is most significant in 'difficult partnership' countries. OECD DAC Policy Statement on Security System Reform and Governance.
  • Topic: Security, Foreign Policy, Defense Policy, International Security
  • Political Geography: Africa
  • Author: Christine Wing
  • Publication Date: 04-2007
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: International Peace Institute
  • Abstract: Questions related to nuclear weapons are highly contested in the international arena—including the question of how these weapons constitute a challenge to human and international security. Does the challenge exist mainly in the incorporation of these weapons into military doctrines, or in the possibility that more states and/or terrorists will acquire nuclear capabilities? Have nuclear weapons and nuclear deterrence prevented major wars, or are they ultimately destabilizing—or could both be true?
  • Topic: Nuclear Weapons, Peace Studies, Weapons of Mass Destruction, International Security, International Affairs
  • Author: James Cockayne
  • Publication Date: 04-2007
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: International Peace Institute
  • Abstract: In most people's view, it is violent crime—not terror, war, disease or famine—that represents the single greatest threat to their personal security. That threat is increasingly global: the globalization of transportation, communications and finance has benefited not only licit business, but also professional criminals, allowing them to organize transnationally. As a result, crime is transforming from a threat to personal security into a strategic threat to national and international security. But even as crime is transnationalized, crime control remains largely corralled behind national borders.
  • Topic: International Relations, Security, Crime, Globalization, War on Drugs, International Security
  • Author: Alistair Millar, Eric Rosand, Jason Ipe
  • Publication Date: 10-2007
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: International Peace Institute
  • Abstract: Since September 2001, the Security Council and its various counterterrorism-related subsidiary bodies have made significant contributions to the global counterterrorism campaign, primarily through norm setting and institution building and by keeping terrorism on the political agenda while engaging in dialogue with—and stimulating the activities of—states and multilateral bodies. Yet, rather than together constituting a comprehensive strategy to address the global terrorist threat, each Council initiative has had an improvisational, ad hoc quality. Following each major terrorist attack—often against one of its own members—the Council's response has extended well beyond the specific incident at hand with little regard to its relation to the already existing Council program.
  • Topic: Conflict Resolution, Security, Peace Studies, Terrorism, United Nations, Weapons of Mass Destruction, International Security
  • Author: William L. Nash, Brent Scowcroft, Samuel R. Berger
  • Publication Date: 09-2005
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Council on Foreign Relations
  • Abstract: From Mogadishu to Mosul, the United States has undertaken six major nation-building operations around the world since 1993. The challenges of terrorism, failed states, and proliferation indicate this trend will only continue. Today, in Iraq, the United States carries the bulk of the nation-building burden. Some 135,000 U.S. troops remain on the ground, at an approximate cost of $50 billion per year. Nearly four years after forcing out the Taliban in Afghanistan, 9,000 NATO forces and 17,000 U.S. troops remain in that country to secure the peace and continue the hunt for al-Qaeda.
  • Topic: Foreign Policy, Defense Policy, International Security
  • Political Geography: Afghanistan, United States, Iraq, Taliban
  • Author: Anja H. Ebnöther, Ernst M. Felberbauer, Martin Malek
  • Publication Date: 04-2005
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Austrian National Defence Academy
  • Abstract: After the collapse of the Soviet Union the five Central Asian former Soviet Republics (Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan) appeared as one region. Though it is scientifically debatable if “Central Asia” consists of only these five stat es or if others should be included as well (e.g. Afghanistan, Mongolia), my findings will basically deal with the five former Soviet Central Asian republics – sometimes, where appropriate, with references to adjacent countries.
  • Topic: Regional Cooperation, Terrorism, International Security
  • Political Geography: Russia, Europe, Middle East, Mongolia, Kazakhstan, Asia, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan
  • Author: Frederic Labarre, Predrag Jureković
  • Publication Date: 05-2004
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Austrian National Defence Academy
  • Abstract: The fall of Communism in Europe, and the end of the bi-polar order put an end to the artificial and forced separation which had been keeping Hungary out of the mainstream of European development for the last 40-plus years. Once that obstacle was removed, a consensus was reached by all Hungarian political parties to become a modern European country in the quickest possible way and with the least sacrifice and develop an economy and culture, social and political structure bases on solid grounds by becoming part of the European and Euro-Atlantic co-operative institutions.
  • Topic: NATO, Democratization, Development, International Cooperation, International Security
  • Political Geography: Europe, Balkans, Hungary