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  • Author: Nicholas Robinson
  • Publication Date: 08-2013
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Center for the Advanced Study of India
  • Abstract: Poor implementation of social welfare programs is a chronic challenge in developing countries such as India. Yet, despite the large number of people affected and the serious consequences of implementation failure, there have been few studies, and even less theorization, of grievance redress in these contexts. Based on fieldwork conducted by the author, this article examines grievance redress for social welfare programs in the Indian states of Madhya Pradesh and Bihar. It argues that the idea of accountability regimes, which has been developed in the administrative law literature, provides a more useful framework for understanding grievance redress than commonly invoked alternatives, such as a purely rights-based approach or an ad hoc analysis of the costs and benefits of specific redress mechanisms. While not rejecting either of these alternatives, it claims that an accountability regime approach that focuses on how officials are monitored and controlled through grievances is both more descriptively complete and more likely to generate a wider range of useful policy prescriptions.
  • Topic: Development, Economics, Human Welfare, Humanitarian Aid, Poverty, Developing World
  • Political Geography: South Asia
  • Author: Devesh Kapur, Megha Aggarwal, Namrata Tognatta
  • Publication Date: 12-2012
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Center for the Advanced Study of India
  • Abstract: This report investigates student awareness, interests and aspirations around general and vocational education. Using a survey administered to class 12 students in one district each in Rajasthan, Chattisgarh, and Karnataka, we attempt to gain a better understanding of student aspirations, awareness levels, sources of information, key stakeholders and factors that influence their education and career choices. We then map student interests against sectors that are slated to experience the highest growth in terms of job creation. Our results indicate aspirations of students are largely misaligned with the needs of the Indian economy. It is important to create opportunities, generate awareness about various career options and the respective pathways available to realise career goals. Our findings have implications for policies aiming to improve participation in vocational education and training.
  • Topic: Development, Economics, Education, Labor Issues
  • Political Geography: South Asia, India
  • Author: T. N. Ninan
  • Publication Date: 12-2011
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Center for the Advanced Study of India
  • Abstract: Distinguished ladies and gentlemen, I must confess that the title for this lecture was thought up on the spur of the moment. Still, you might wonder which characters in Dickens' novels we can see in the Indian media. I can readily say that many journalists see latter-day versions of Uncle Scrooge; publishers who want to run their empires on shoestring budgets. Publishers, in turn, will say we have our Oliver Twist journalists, who keep asking their employers for more-even when salaries are doubling every four or five years. We have reporters who are Artful Dodgers, especially when it comes to deadlines. We have bankrupt TV moguls who, like Micawber, are forever hoping that something will turn up. And of course, many readers are like Pip, they had great expectations about the media but feel robbed and are disappointed. But when I fixed on the title, of a Dickensian Age for the Indian media, I had none of this in mind. My thought was the more predictable one, that this is a tale not of two cities but two narratives, competing narratives.
  • Topic: Economics, Communications, Mass Media
  • Political Geography: South Asia
  • Author: Narendra Jadhav
  • Publication Date: 11-2009
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Center for the Advanced Study of India
  • Abstract: Well, ladies and gentlemen, I feel greatly honored to have been invited to deliver this inaugural keynote lecture in the Nand Jeet Khemka Distinguished Lecture series for this international conference on India's Dalits. I am indeed grateful to my friend Professor Devesh Kapur, Director of CASI, and his colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania for providing me this opportunity to participate in this conference on a theme that has been very close to my heart. I understand that the Nand Jeet Khemka Distinguished Lecture series comprises public lectures on contemporary India that will stimulate a dialogue on campus. Given this focus of the distinguished lecture series and the fact that this also happens to be the inaugural keynote lecture for this International Conference on India's Dalits, I have chosen to share some thoughts with you this evening on the theme of “Empowerment of Dalits and Adivasis: Role of Education in the Emerging Indian Economy.”
  • Topic: Development, Economics, Education
  • Political Geography: India, Asia
  • Author: Joydeep Mukherji
  • Publication Date: 03-2006
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Center for the Advanced Study of India
  • Abstract: Recent optimism about India is based on the view that the country may finally be on a higher growth trajectory after more than a decade of halting economic reform. Spurred by a balance of payments crisis a decade ago that pushed the government of India to nearly defaulting on its foreign debt, a series of coalition governments have slowly deregulated the once most-regulated economy outside the communist world. Over the years, the government has enlarged the role of market forces, given more freedom to the private sector, and cut barriers to domestic and foreign competition. At the same time, India's state governments have gained considerable autonomy from the central government, making India into the federal state envisaged in its constitution.
  • Topic: Development, Economics, International Trade and Finance
  • Political Geography: India, East Asia, Asia
  • Author: Sunil Bharti Mittal
  • Publication Date: 02-2006
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Center for the Advanced Study of India
  • Abstract: I am Francine Frankel, director of the Center for the Advanced Study of India, and it is my great pleasure this evening to introduce our speaker for CASI's Annual Lecture, Sunil Bharti Mittal, the founder, chairman, and group managing director, Bharti Enterprises. I hardly need tell this audience that Bharti Tele-Ventures is India's leading telecom conglomerate and its largest mobile service operator.
  • Topic: Development, Economics, International Trade and Finance
  • Political Geography: India, East Asia, Asia
  • Author: Rajrishi Singhal
  • Publication Date: 07-2004
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Center for the Advanced Study of India
  • Abstract: The Planning Commission of India, in its Approach Paper for the Tenth Five-Year Plan (2002- 07), set its sights on two lofty targets: doubling per capita income over the next 10 years—compared to similar goals over 20 years as was previously the norm—and reducing the incidence of poverty by five percentage points.
  • Topic: Development, Economics, Government
  • Political Geography: South Asia, India
  • Author: Kandula Subramaniam
  • Publication Date: 05-2004
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Center for the Advanced Study of India
  • Abstract: In 1991, before the New Power Policy was announced opening the Indian power supply industry to private investment, the country was experiencing power shortages. Sanghvi (1991) estimated that in countries like India, electricity shortages led to a loss of 1.5 to 2 percent of gross domestic product (GDP). Ten years later, India still experiences shortages of power in the form of load-shedding. Even grid breakdowns have become a regular feature. In 2001 alone, there were two major grid collapses, bringing several Indian states to a grinding halt for more than one day.
  • Topic: Economics, International Trade and Finance, Science and Technology
  • Political Geography: South Asia, India
  • Author: Joydeep Mukherji
  • Publication Date: 11-2002
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Center for the Advanced Study of India
  • Abstract: I join you tonight to consider India on the scales of greatness. In other words, to ask: by what standards do people regard a state as great? And how does India conform to those standards? I must say at the outset, that these are not questions on which I personally would fixate. Greatness in terms of power is not a standard that moves me as a human being. My impulse when looking at countries is to say, “what's so great about being great?” I think a country's taxi drivers tell us more about it than the number of nuclear bombs it might possess. The number of Ph.D. holders, engineers, and writers driving taxicabs in a country, and where they came from, tells me a lot about the country we're in and the country from whence they came. The taxi driver in Iran who complains bitterly about the ayatollahs and wants to talk about pop music and freedom, tells me something about Iran. The engineer who fled Nigeria for the opportunity possible in America, even if it's driving a cab, tells me something about Nigeria and the U.S. Great power has little to do with it.
  • Topic: Economics, Industrial Policy
  • Political Geography: America, Iran, South Asia, India, Nigeria
  • Author: Joydeep Mukherji
  • Publication Date: 11-2002
  • Content Type: Working Paper
  • Institution: Center for the Advanced Study of India
  • Abstract: According to the Bible, Saul of Tarsus converted almost instantly to Christianity on the road to Damascus. Subsequently, he neither ate nor drank for three days. The conversion of the world's second largest country, India, to a new way of life based on free markets and private enterprise will not be so rapid or disruptive. Nevertheless, India's conversion to market economics will, like Saul's, be thorough and deep. It will increasingly affect all of us in the global village, in which Indians constitute 17% of the inhabitants.
  • Topic: Economics, Industrial Policy
  • Political Geography: South Asia, India