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You searched for: Content Type Policy Brief Remove constraint Content Type: Policy Brief Publishing Institution Center for Defense Information Remove constraint Publishing Institution: Center for Defense Information Topic Terrorism Remove constraint Topic: Terrorism
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  • Author: Rachel Stohl, Winslow Wheeler, Mark Burgess, Marta Conti, Monica Czwarno, Ana Marte
  • Publication Date: 10-2007
  • Content Type: Policy Brief
  • Institution: Center for Defense Information
  • Abstract: Six years Ago, the United States began its operations in Afghanistan in response to the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. At the time, scant attention was paid to the dangers of landmines, unexploded ordnance and small arms that plagued the country. Now, six years later, U.S. and coalition military forces serving in Afghanistan continue to face a variety of dangers, beyond the unfriendly geography and resurgent Taliban forces. Troops supporting the international Security Assistance Force (ISAF) and operation enduring Freedom (OEF) face additional challenges from landmines, unexploded ordnance, man-portable air defense systems and other small arms.
  • Topic: Defense Policy, Terrorism, War
  • Political Geography: Afghanistan, United States, Asia
  • Author: Philip E. Coyle, Whitney Parker, Rachel Stohl, Winslow Wheeler, Victoria Samson, Jessica Ashooh, Mark Burgess, Rhea Myerscough
  • Publication Date: 09-2006
  • Content Type: Policy Brief
  • Institution: Center for Defense Information
  • Abstract: In the days before Sept. 11, riding the post-Cold War high, America was blissfully unaware of the threats it faced, and why. A few in the William J. Clinton administration tried to warn their successors about al-Qaida's danger, but overall, most Americans were blindsided by the Sept. 11 attacks. Five years later, America is still largely in the dark.
  • Topic: Defense Policy, Terrorism, War
  • Political Geography: Afghanistan, United States, Iraq, Middle East, Asia
  • Author: Victoria Samson
  • Publication Date: 01-2006
  • Content Type: Policy Brief
  • Institution: Center for Defense Information
  • Abstract: The United States just took one small step away from the brink. Congress has opted against funding research for a nuclear weapon that would target underground bunkers. This decision squelched a program that would likely have created a new nuclear warhead, something that is particularly incongruous at a time when nations around the world are fervently trying to convince the leaderships of North Korea and Iran that their countries do not need nuclear weapons. However, this wisdom on the part of the U.S. government may prove to be temporary.
  • Topic: Government, Nuclear Weapons, Terrorism, War
  • Political Geography: Afghanistan, United States, Asia, North Korea
  • Author: Chet Richards
  • Publication Date: 10-2005
  • Content Type: Policy Brief
  • Institution: Center for Defense Information
  • Abstract: There is a principle of engineering that says that when what you're doing isn't working, and trying harder makes the situation worse, you may be solving the wrong problem. With the attacks on London proving that occupying Iraq is not making the world safer, it is time for a radically new approach.
  • Topic: Defense Policy, Government, Terrorism, War
  • Political Geography: United States, Iraq, Europe, Middle East, London
  • Author: Col. Daniel Smith
  • Publication Date: 02-2003
  • Content Type: Policy Brief
  • Institution: Center for Defense Information
  • Abstract: At the start of 2003, the United States remains focused on fighting global terrorism in general even as it zeroes in on Iraq as the nexus of evil. But a number of factors in play today make international support for such a venture less effusive than in 1990-91, when the last anti-Saddam “coalition of the willing” formed. Many economies, including those of three of the four big financial supporters of the 1990-91 war — Japan, Germany, and Saudi Arabia — are weaker. Any war would be relatively more expensive. Suspicions about U.S. motives, fueled by the Bush administration's initial unilateralism, remain alive despite Washington's patient work in obtaining a UN Security Council resolution on new inspections. Germany has declared it will provide no forces; use of Saudi Arabian airbases to launch combat missions against Iraq remains unclear; and troop contributions, as well as moral support, from other Arab states such as Egypt and Syria may not materialize.
  • Topic: Security, Defense Policy, Terrorism, War, Weapons of Mass Destruction
  • Political Geography: United States, Japan, Iraq, Germany, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Egypt
  • Author: Stephen H. Baker
  • Publication Date: 12-2002
  • Content Type: Policy Brief
  • Institution: Center for Defense Information
  • Abstract: Throughout the spring, summer and fall of this year thousands of U.S. military planners have worked on the various contingencies and strategies concerning a possible invasion of Iraq.
  • Topic: Security, Defense Policy, Terrorism, Weapons of Mass Destruction
  • Political Geography: United States, Iraq
  • Author: Mark Burgess
  • Publication Date: 09-2002
  • Content Type: Policy Brief
  • Institution: Center for Defense Information
  • Abstract: An Afghan Blitzkrieg? Sept. 11, 2001, transformed Afghanistan even more than it did America. The pariah state which harbored Osama bin Laden, and was the base camp for his al Qaeda network, immediately became the focus of the U.S. war against terrorism. The Afghan campaign began amid dire warnings of the dangers historically faced by foreign interlopers in the country that was center stage of central Asia's “great game” during the 19th and 20th centuries and that would become the first battlefield of an even greater one during the first year of the 21st. The experience of the British and the Soviets was held up as an example of what fate potentially awaited any American intervention in Afghanistan. A year later, such warnings seem overstated. Al Qaeda's camps in Afghanistan have been destroyed, the Taliban ousted, and an Afghan Transitional Government rules in their place. Meanwhile, life for the average Afghan is a considerably less nasty and brutish affair than it was a little over a year ago — all in short order and at a relatively low cost in human life. Such successes notwithstanding, the Afghan campaign is not yet over. It has not been without failings, some of which may return to haunt ongoing operations there. Similarly, some of the methods used to achieve this success, while effective in the short term, may yet prove polemical.
  • Topic: Security, Defense Policy, Terrorism, Weapons of Mass Destruction
  • Political Geography: Afghanistan
  • Author: Fleur A. Burke
  • Publication Date: 08-2002
  • Content Type: Policy Brief
  • Institution: Center for Defense Information
  • Abstract: When the united states began airstrikes in Afghanistan in October 2001, U.S. planes were threatened by Stinger missiles that had been provided to the mujaheddin by the United States in the 1980s. Since at least the mid-1990s, the use of legally exported U.S. weaponry to bomb and burn Kurdish villages in southeastern Turkey has been documented. Turkish forces have also used U.S.-supplied light weaponry in specific human rights violations, ranging from torture to indiscriminate firing on civilians.
  • Topic: Security, Defense Policy, Terrorism, Weapons of Mass Destruction
  • Political Geography: Turkey
  • Author: Dan Smith
  • Publication Date: 06-2002
  • Content Type: Policy Brief
  • Institution: Center for Defense Information
  • Abstract: In the aftermath of the attacks of Sept. 11, the accusation was “intelligence failure.” In the aftermath of the series of revelations in May and June 2002 about bureaucratic bungling in the weeks before the attacks, the accusation was “what did the president know and when did he know it?”
  • Topic: Security, Defense Policy, Terrorism, Weapons of Mass Destruction
  • Author: Dr. Bruce G. Blair
  • Publication Date: 05-2002
  • Content Type: Policy Brief
  • Institution: Center for Defense Information
  • Abstract: President george W. Bush's new Nuclear Posture Review harks back to the stone age, or at least to the 1950s, when America's most beautiful minds struggled to devise a strategy to deal with the original rogue state — the Soviet Union. The latest exercise to devise a nuclear strategy to neutralize threats of weapons of mass destruction wielded by the 2002-class of rogue states such as Iraq and North Korea is proof that time folds over on itself, and that higher-order nuclear intelligence is as elusive as table-top fusion. This repetition of history isn't funny, but it is dangerous.
  • Topic: Security, Defense Policy, Terrorism, Weapons of Mass Destruction
  • Political Geography: Iraq, North Korea
  • Author: Dan Smith
  • Publication Date: 04-2002
  • Content Type: Policy Brief
  • Institution: Center for Defense Information
  • Abstract: IN HIS JAN. 29, 2002 State of the Union Address to Congress and the American public, U.S. President George W. Bush described a tripartite “axis of evil” threatening the United States.
  • Topic: Security, Defense Policy, Terrorism, Weapons of Mass Destruction
  • Political Geography: United States
  • Author: Glenn Baker
  • Publication Date: 03-2002
  • Content Type: Policy Brief
  • Institution: Center for Defense Information
  • Abstract: A Cdi Delegation Traveled to Cuba Feb. 27-March 3 and met top Cuban officials, including Fidel Castro, to explore the possibility of closer cooperation between the United States and Cuba in the fight against drugs and terrorism. CDI President Bruce Blair led a group that included Gen. (Ret.) Barry McCaffrey, Gen. (Ret.) Charles Wilhelm, and members of the CDI board and staff. McCaffrey was “drug czar” under President Clinton; Wilhelm was commander in chief of Southern Command from 1997-2000, and now serves as a Distinguished Military Fellow with CDI. He also went to Cuba with a CDI delegation in February 2001.
  • Topic: Security, Defense Policy, Terrorism, Weapons of Mass Destruction
  • Political Geography: United States
  • Author: Christopher Hellman
  • Publication Date: 02-2002
  • Content Type: Policy Brief
  • Institution: Center for Defense Information
  • Abstract: On feb. 4, the administration of President George W. Bush released its proposed federal budget for fiscal year 2003 (FY'03). It includes a $396.1 billion request for national security: a whopping $379.3 billion for the Defense Department and $16.8 billion for the nuclear weapons functions of the Department of Energy. This is $48 billion above current annual spending levels, an increase of 13 percent. It is also 15 percent above the Cold War average, to fund a military force structure that is one-third smaller than it was a decade ago.
  • Topic: Security, Defense Policy, Terrorism, Weapons of Mass Destruction
  • Author: Daniel Smith
  • Publication Date: 01-2002
  • Content Type: Policy Brief
  • Institution: Center for Defense Information
  • Abstract: Sept. 11 did not presage or begin a new war. For more than 30 years, the modern world has confronted terrorism in the form of plane hijackings, massacres of travelers and athletes, and assassinations of politicians and military and business people. During the same 30 years, untold numbers of civilians in countries all over the world have been wounded, maimed, and killed as groups vying for personal and political power have battled each other, sometimes with the backing or even direct intervention of neighboring states.
  • Topic: Security, Defense Policy, Terrorism, Weapons of Mass Destruction
  • Author: Rachel Stohl, Michael Stohl, Matthew Lewis
  • Publication Date: 10-2001
  • Content Type: Policy Brief
  • Institution: Center for Defense Information
  • Abstract: The Events Of Sept. 11 may prove, as so many have claimed in their immediate aftermath, to be a true watershed in international relations and for the lives of American citizens. However, there can be no doubt that the events changed the priorities of U.S. President George W. Bush, and challenged the approach to international relations that characterized the first nine months of the new administration. To that end, the current security environment will have significant impacts on the persisting problem of failed and failing states.
  • Topic: Religion, Terrorism
  • Political Geography: Arabia