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  • Author: Donald Kerwin
  • Publication Date: 06-2015
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal on Migration and Human Security
  • Institution: Center for Migration Studies of New York
  • Abstract: In 2013, the Center for Migration Studies of New York (CMS) initiated a project to bring concentrated academic and policy attention to the US refugee protection system, broadly understood to encompass refugees, asylum seekers and refugeelike populations in need of protection. The initiative gave rise to a series of papers published in 2014 and 2015, which CMS is releasing as a special collection in its Journal on Migration and Human Security on the 35th anniversary of the Refugee Act of 1980. This introductory essay situates the papers in the collection within a broader discussion of state compliance with international law, impediments to protection, US protection programs, vulnerable populations, and due process concerns. The essay sets forth extensive policy recommendations to strengthen the system drawn from the papers, legislative proposals, and other sources.
  • Topic: International Law, Refugee Issues, Refugee Crisis
  • Political Geography: Global Focus
  • Author: Tuba İnal
  • Publication Date: 05-2011
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Uluslararasi Iliskiler
  • Institution: Uluslararasi Iliskiler
  • Abstract: Th is article seeks to explain two related theoretical questions by looking at the treatment of two related practices of war, pillage and rape, by international law: How does change, particularly legalized regime change, happen in international relations and what is the role of “gender” as a category in this process of change? The argument here is that three conditions are necessary for the emergence of a legalized prohibition regime: Firstly, states must believe that they can comply with the prohibition because non-compliance is costly. Secondly, a normative context conducive to the idea that the particular practice is abnormal/undesirable is necessary. Thirdly, actors actively propagating these ideas to promote the creation of a particular regime should exist. The 100-year temporal difference between the emergence of the regimes against pillage and rape reveals the role of gender in this process.
  • Topic: Gender Issues, International Law, War Crimes
  • Political Geography: Global Focus
  • Author: Ozan Değer
  • Publication Date: 09-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Uluslararasi Iliskiler
  • Institution: Uluslararasi Iliskiler
  • Abstract: Genocide, as an act and a violation of law, place at the top of the hierarchy of crimes and is qualified as crime of crimes. Essentially, being evaluated within the frame of international law, this crime gradually has been come within the scope of the national law. Either the conception or the crime of genocide was composed because of the massacres executed during the WWII, mainly. The basic legal arrangement about the crime was passed at 9 December 1948 and come into effect at 12 January 1951 named United Nations Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide. Convention is obliged the states on the prevention and the punishment of the crime of genocide. Since international criminal courts/tribunals are restricted by the principle of individual criminal responsibility and the Convention incurs the obligation on states, the violation of the Convention causes the responsibility of states. This article, under the light of the conceptional and legal frame, discusses the obligations and responsibilities incur by the Convention and the dramatic judgment of the ICJ, in short, the place and situation of crime of genocide and state responsibility at the legal texts and international jurisprudences.
  • Topic: Genocide, International Law
  • Political Geography: Global Focus