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  • Publication Date: 06-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of International Affairs
  • Institution: School of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University
  • Abstract: Patrick Awuah is the founder and president of Ashesi University, a private liberal arts college located in Accra, Ghana. He was born in Ghana but left in the mid-1980s to pursue an education in the United States, earning a bachelor's degree from Swarthmore College and a master of business administration from the Haas School of Business at the University of California at Berkeley. He later earned an honorary doctorate from Swarthmore College. After eight years working as a program manager and engineer for the Microsoft Corporation in Seattle, Awuah returned to his home country to found Ashesi University, currently the sole accredited coeducational liberal arts college in West Africa. Awuah solicited massive financial support from the private sector, particularly American corporate donors, like Microsoft. Beginning with a pilot class of thirty students in 2002, Ashesi University now has 352 students, 87 percent of whom are Ghanaian, and 50 percent of whom receive financial aid. Awuah has earned international acclaim for his commitment to creating a model for quality private education in Africa. He spoke to Emily Gouillart of the Journal of International Affairs about the experience of founding and building Ashesi University, the future of education in Africa and the importance of ethics in curriculum building.
  • Political Geography: Africa, United States
  • Author: Elizabeth Sperbee
  • Publication Date: 06-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of International Affairs
  • Institution: School of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University
  • Abstract: Since the mid-1990s, China has rapidly expanded its engagement with African states. Study of Sino-African relations has subsequently begun to burgeon. In China into Africa: Trade, Aid and Influence, Robert Rotberg's multinational slate of authors introduce key issues in this literature from a variety of perspectives. The result is a volume worth reading cover to cover. A sometimes redundant, sometimes contradictory assemblage, China into Africa nevertheless provides a fascinating introduction not only to a variety of issues at stake in Sino-African relations, but also, necessarily, to the issues at stake in the study of those relations.
  • Political Geography: Africa, China
  • Author: Andrew Rathmell
  • Publication Date: 11-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Security Sector Management
  • Institution: Centre for Security Sector Management
  • Abstract: The development of local security and justice sectors in developing, fragile and conflict-affected states has for a long time been an important strand in the UK’s approach to delivering its national security and development objectives. The 2009 White Paper on international development committed DFID to placing considerably greater emphasis on promoting security and access to justice in developing states. The Ministry of Defence’s Green Paper is likely to place greater emphasis on soft power, including security cooperation activities. In some countries, the UK has poured bilateral resources into this domain, from the training of Afghan military and police to the reform of the Sierra Leone security sector and the strengthening of various African militaries and police forces.
  • Topic: International Relations
  • Political Geography: United Kingdom
  • Author: David Chuter
  • Publication Date: 11-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Security Sector Management
  • Institution: Centre for Security Sector Management
  • Abstract: The author has argued in a previous article that Security Sector Reform (SSR) is essentially a melange of Anglo-Saxon Civil-Military Relations (CMR) theory and the traditional dim view of the military usually held by those in the development sector. This article, treats the first component in more detail, since the main theoretical assumptions of SSR about the security sector, the place of the military, and so forth, are essentially dependent on the validity of certain propositions advanced by CMR theorists in the past. Thus, if these propositions are shown to be false, or even incomplete, then there must be important reservations about the validity of much SSR thinking, not to mention practice. It is, indeed, the element of practice which is especially important here, because, unlike CMR which was essentially descriptive, SSR is overtly prescriptive. A theory which describes reality incorrectly or incompletely is unfortunate, but that a doctrine which prescribes action on the basis of a fallacious theory is positively dangerous.
  • Author: James Cohen
  • Publication Date: 11-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Security Sector Management
  • Institution: Centre for Security Sector Management
  • Abstract: The goal of this paper is to propose principal-agent theory (PAT), a methodology adapted from economics to analyse the relations of a buyer and a seller, as a possible tool for an SSR practitioners' assessment toolbox. The added value of PAT is its capacity to analyse the relationships between actors of the security sector based on observable, measurable and tangible mechanisms that the actors utilise in controlling, resisting, and allying with other actors. This capacity to analyse these relations has been sought out in both academic critiques of SSR and from practitioners themselves. This paper is an initial proposal on the added value of PAT, in addition to demonstrating how it could be used, gaps are also identified on how to potentially take this tool forward to aid the SSR community.
  • Topic: Economics
  • Political Geography: United States
  • Author: Jake Sherman
  • Publication Date: 02-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Security Sector Management
  • Institution: Centre for Security Sector Management
  • Abstract: In 2005, the Government of Afghanistan initiated a process leading to the formulation of the Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS). The ANDS was formally launched at the International Conference in Support of Afghanistan in Paris on June 12, 2008. According to the Paris Conference Declaration, the strategy will be the “roadmap for joint action [by donors and the Afghan government] over the next five years and sets our shared priorities.”
  • Topic: Government
  • Political Geography: Afghanistan
  • Author: Robert Muggah, Nat J. Colletta
  • Publication Date: 02-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Security Sector Management
  • Institution: Centre for Security Sector Management
  • Abstract: The intensity and complexity of post-war violence routinely exceeds expectations. Many development and security specialists fear that, if left unchecked, mutating violence can potentially tip 'fragile' societies back into war. An array of 'conventional' security promotion activities are regularly advanced to prevent this from happening, including disarmament, demobilization and reintegration (DDR) and other forms of security sector reform (SSR). Meanwhile, a host of less widely recognised examples of security promotion activities are emerging that deviate from – and also potentially reinforce – DDR and SSR. Innovation and experimentation by mediators and practitioners has yielded a range of promising activities designed to mitigate the risks and symptoms of post-war violence including interim stabilisation measures and second generation security promotion interventions. Drawing on original evidence, this article considers a number of critical determinants of post-war violence that potentially shape the character and effectiveness of security promotion on the ground. It then issues a typology of security promotion practices occurring before, during and after more conventional interventions such as DDR and SSR. Taken together, the identification of alternative approaches to security promotion implies a challenging new research agenda for the growing field of security and development.
  • Topic: Security, Development, War, Reform
  • Political Geography: United States
  • Author: Mark Knight
  • Publication Date: 02-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Security Sector Management
  • Institution: Centre for Security Sector Management
  • Abstract: This paper asserts that there is a tension between traditional development paradigms and the post-Cold War leitmotif of democratisation which is as yet unresolved within the present SSR discourse. This tension is identified between what the paper describes as the developmental objectives of SSR, and its inherent democratic articulation. The paper argues that democratic principles remain the organisational logic within which SSR processes are conceived as taking place; and that a democratic environment is supported in order for the purpose of SSR – development – to be achieved. The paper takes issue with this model, and advocates for two alterations in the present SSR discourse. First, that SSR should be viewed as a democratising endeavour, specifically focused upon the security and justice processes, but retaining democracy as its intended measurable output. Second, that the conceptual device of the 'social contract', that describes the citizen/state relationship, should become a pivotal consideration when conceiving and delivering support to SSR processes.
  • Topic: Cold War, Development, Reform
  • Political Geography: Europe
  • Publication Date: 06-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Bildhaan: An International Journal of Somali Studies
  • Institution: Macalester College
  • Abstract: No abstract is available.
  • Author: Ahmed I. Samatar
  • Publication Date: 06-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Bildhaan: An International Journal of Somali Studies
  • Institution: Macalester College
  • Abstract: As Bildhaan ends its ninth year of existence, Somali society in the Horn of Africa enters yet another phase of its endless descent into violent contest over an already pestilent present. Nearly half of the Somali population in the country are now designated as malnourished and, thus, increasingly dependent upon international food assistance. This fact and others make Somalia the worst country in the whole world in terms of the Quality of Life Index.
  • Political Geography: Africa, Somalia
  • Publication Date: 06-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Bildhaan: An International Journal of Somali Studies
  • Institution: Macalester College
  • Abstract: Is an annual refereed scholarly journal that welcomes submissions relevant to any aspect of Somali society. In addition, the Journal seeks works that are transdisciplinary in both perspective and method. Hie length of the essays and articles should he up to 3000 words, double spaced, with notes and bibliography at the end. Moreover, all figures and tables should be professional in appearance and professionally produced, if appropriate. Present one figure or table per page. Proclucing figures and tables on a laser printer will render camera-ready quality.
7812. A Buraanbur
  • Author: Caasho Sheekh Maxamed
  • Publication Date: 06-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Bildhaan: An International Journal of Somali Studies
  • Institution: Macalester College
  • Abstract: Illaahow boqorow baryadaada ha igu qadin Allow samadaada oo igu beeg ballaqan Allow awoodd buuxda oo aan baaqan lagu aqbalo Allow buuggaaga sharafta leh bog lagaga qoro Allow u bayaami sida waa baryiyo dharaar
  • Author: Lee Cassanelli
  • Publication Date: 06-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Bildhaan: An International Journal of Somali Studies
  • Institution: Macalester College
  • Abstract: This article is a preliminary and exploratory examination of three distinct traditions of intellectual production in Somalia: the Western secular tradition, the Islamic religious tradition, and the indigenous Somali poetic tradition. Historians who seek to reconstruct Somalia's past have found valuable knowledge in the products of each of these traditions, and analysts of contemporary Somalia have argued that Somalis must draw on the wisdom and experience of all three if they hope to escape from their current national crisis. Unfortunately, most scholars of Somali Studies (myself included) draw their assumptions, pursue evidence, and conduct their research from within only one, or at most two, of these intellectual traditions. As a consequence, our understanding of Somalia has been limited by the fragmentation of knowledge as it is produced, transmitted, and received by successive generations of Somali Studies students and scholars.
  • Political Geography: Somalia
  • Author: Ahmed I. Samatar
  • Publication Date: 06-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Bildhaan: An International Journal of Somali Studies
  • Institution: Macalester College
  • Abstract: It is a bit muggy but still a gorgeous and clear morning in Toronto, Canada, in early August 2008. A brief and comfortable train ride from the center of the city, one of North America's most cosmopolitan urban concentrations, delivers me to the stop where Ms. Maryan Omar Ali, Aryette, was waiting for me to visit with her. After a few minutes of looking for each other among a throng of people in the arrival area—I have not seen Maryan for more than 17 years—we greeted warmly and then left the station together for the very short bus ride to the large building where her residence is located. Maryan, despite the passage of so many years and some testing health-related experiences, looked buoyant, tranquil, and eager to show me around and then engage in a thorough conversation about her background, passion for Somali literary aesthetics and production, and developments in her life in recent years. We arrived at her compact and neat apartment. Her mother, Sahra Omer Goud, whose strong and kind voice I have heard over the telephone on numerous times, was at the door with a genuine welcoming smile. Once I entered, I could smell the appetizing aroma of the legendary Zeila cooking—perhaps the most sophisticated culinary tradition in all of the Somali-inhabited territories in the Horn of Africa. As is customary, we took off our shoes and walked into the living room. Before we sat, I requested to go to the bathroom to put on a comfortable macawis that I had brought with me for the occasion. We washed our hands and began to devour a tasty lunch of spiced and grilled wild-caught salmon, delicious rice cooked with cloves, cumin, and cardamom and flavored with a dash of raisins, followed by lots of fresh salad and fruits. Soon, Maryan and I were sitting opposite each other with the tiny but powerful recording machine between us. We were surrounded by numerous artistic artifacts, almost all Somali, and stacks of carefully labeled disks—a testimony to her well-established reputation, among those in-the-know, as a premier cartographer and archivist of types of Somali literary production. We agreed to divide the interview into three main parts: her background; her collection and knowledge of popular songs; and her courageous fight against an onslaught of breast cancer—an illness heretofore not publicly discussed by Somalis with the misfortune of contracting it.
  • Political Geography: Africa, Canada, Somalia, Toronto
  • Author: Anna Lindley
  • Publication Date: 06-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Bildhaan: An International Journal of Somali Studies
  • Institution: Macalester College
  • Abstract: These views neatly capture the ambiguous feelings that soon become apparent when asking Somali Londoners about sending money “home.” A relative minority of the Somali regions' so-called “missing million” have settled in the Global North, but they provide the bulk of remittance funds. A key node in global trade and finance, London has also witnessed “globalisation from below”: by the beginning of the 21st century over one third of the workforce was born abroad. While the dynamics and impact of immigration and asylum in London are relatively well-recorded and well-researched, the fact that London is also a key source of remittances for poorer countries has only come to the attention of researchers and policymakers in recent years. The World Bank in 2008 suggested that migrants in the U.K. sent official remittances amounting to some $4.5 billion in 2006.
  • Political Geography: United Kingdom, London, Somalia
  • Author: Abdi Ismael Samatar
  • Publication Date: 06-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Bildhaan: An International Journal of Somali Studies
  • Institution: Macalester College
  • Abstract: Simply put, this line and the spirit of the whole song echo Somalis' traditional acumen to generate timely ideas and the competence to listen and heed productive compromises. These attributes that nurtured their collective best interests have been on the wane for three decades and are now in peril or even to perish for eternity. As a result, much despair is visible in the Somali landscape. Yet it is worth remembering that there is no inevitability about the extension of the present despondency into the future as long as civic-minded Somalis are resolute and remain wedded to their compatriots' well-being and cardinal values.
  • Political Geography: Somalia
  • Author: Ihotu Ali
  • Publication Date: 06-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Bildhaan: An International Journal of Somali Studies
  • Institution: Macalester College
  • Abstract: As a nation of immigrants, the United States has also been a nation of nativists...We have welcomed immigrants in periods of expansion and optimism, reviled them in periods of stagnation and cynicism...In short, American nativism has had less to do with 'them' than us...Fear and loathing of foreigners reach such levels when the nation's problems become so intractable that some people seek scapegoats. Typically, these periods feature a political or economic crisis, combined with a loss of faith in American institutions and a sense that the national community is gravely fractured. Nativists' targets have reflected America's basic divisions: class, race, religion, and, to a lesser extent, language and culture.
  • Political Geography: United States, America, Somalia
  • Author: Yusuf Sheikh Omar
  • Publication Date: 06-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Bildhaan: An International Journal of Somali Studies
  • Institution: Macalester College
  • Abstract: This brief study explores Somali youth experiences and perceptions of integration experiences in the school context, comparing the differences and similarities of those who live in Melbourne and Minneapolis. Additionally, the study touches on parents' experiences with their children's attitudes in the new environment. Based on interviews with Somali youth from the cities of Melbourne, Australia, and Minneapolis, Minnesota in the United States, they are generally aspirants to, and positive about, the current and future educational opportunities they have in Australia and the United States. Those from Minneapolis tend to articulate these opportunities more clearly. Youth and parents agree that Somali girls perform better at school compared to boys. Students' preferences for post-secondary programs are varied but the most popular reason is to help Somali people who are in difficult situations because of the protracted civil war. Both student groups from Melbourne and Minneapolis mentioned several educational challenges. Girls believe that parents pushing their daughters to marry early is the biggest obstacle that may prevent them from continuing further studies and future professional work. Whether they are in or out of school, most Somali students who participated in this study are friends primarily with other Somali youth because of cultural and religious affinities, with the added benefit of pleasing their parents. Finally, with the exception of two girls, Somali youth in this study feel they have been fairly treated by their teachers.
  • Political Geography: United States, Australia, Somalia, Melbourne, Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • Author: Mohamed A. Eno, Omar A. Eno
  • Publication Date: 06-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Bildhaan: An International Journal of Somali Studies
  • Institution: Macalester College
  • Abstract: The prolonged, two-year reconciliation conference held in Kenya and the resulting interim administration, implemented under the dominant tutelage of Ethiopia, are generally considered to have failed to live up to the expectations of the Somali people. The state structure was built on the foundation of a clan power segregation system known as 4.5 (four-point-five). This means the separation of the Somali people into four clans that are equal and, as such, pure Somali, against an amalgamation of various clans and communities that are unequal to the first group and, hence, considered “impure” or less Somali. The lumping together of all the latter communities is regarded as equivalent only to a half of the share of a clan.
  • Political Geography: Kenya, Ethiopia, Somalia
  • Author: Bedri Gencer
  • Publication Date: 10-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Bilgi
  • Institution: Değişim Yayınları
  • Abstract: Bu makalede çağımızda “refah devleti” ve “sosyal devlet” anlayışlarının egemenlik kazanmasından sonra nasıl geleneksel “kerim devlet” anlayışına dönüldüğü ele alınmaktadır. Osmanlı örneğinde geleneksel dünyagörüşüne göre adil devlet, kısaca tebaasının geçimini, kerim devlet ise bakımını üstlenen devleti belirtir. XIX. asırda yükselen sanayi kapitalizminin derinleştirdiği sosyal eşitsizlik, devletin meşruiyet kazanmak için tekrar refah misyonunu üstlenmesini gerektirdi. XX. asırda revaç bulan refah devleti, geleneksel “adil devlet,” temelde ikinci kuşak insan haklarının sağlanmasını hedef edinen sosyal devlet ise “kerim devlet”in çağımızdaki karşılıkları sayılabilirlerdi. Ancak aslında moral ekonomi çağına özgü bu devlet modellerinin modern çağa özgü kapitalist mantıkça zorlanması üzerine başlıca feminist düşünürler tarafından vatandaşların hem geçim ve temelde vakıflar gibi sivil toplum kuruluşları sayesinde bakımlarının üstlenildiği, hem de kimliklerinin tanındığı inâî, yani “kerim devlet” modeli tekrar gündeme getirilmiştir.
  • Author: Şükrü Nişancı
  • Publication Date: 10-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Bilgi
  • Institution: Değişim Yayınları
  • Abstract: En az bir buçuk yüzyıldan beri Türkiye‟de siyasal politikaların ve söylemin sıklet noktasını pozitivist bakış açısının oluşturduğu söylenebilir. Ancak erken denebilecek bir zamanda Türkiye‟ye giren pozitivizmin en belirgin özelliği felsefi derinlikten yoksun olması ve buna bağlı olarak siyasal alanda verimli bir izinin bulunmamasıdır. Çalışmada bunun nedenleri incelenmektedir. Bilim geleneğinin olmaması yanında herhalde bunun en önemli nedeni siyasal kaygıların daima ön planda olmasıdır; ülkenin “beka” problemine yoğunlaşan İttihat ve Terakki temsilcileri için bilimin “açıklayıcılığı” değil, “kurtarıcılığı” önemlidir. Pozitivizmin daha genel olarak bilim-siyaset ilişkisinin Batıdakinin tersi yönde şekillenmesi, yani bilimin siyasetin emrine koşul(landırıl)ması, bilimin popüler şeklinin cazip hale gelmesine yol açmıştır. Daha sonraki dönemlerde aynı mantalitenin geçerli olduğunu söylemek mümkündür.
  • Author: Fatih Demir
  • Publication Date: 10-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Bilgi
  • Institution: Değişim Yayınları
  • Abstract: Tarihsel bir süreç içinde sivil ve askeri yöneticilerin alanlarının birbirinden ayrılmasından sonra sivil-asker ilişkilerinde sivil kontrolün oluşturulması konusunda zorluklarla karşılaşılmıştır. Liberal demokrasiler bu soruna çözümler üretmişlerdir, fakat bu çözümler doğaları gereği başka sorunlara yol açmıştır. Liberal demokrasinin ordu-sivil ilişkileri alanındaki geçmişi, bir yanda orduların etkin işlemesi için gereken özgünlüğü ve ulusal güvenlik, diğer yanda ordunun halkın seçilmiş temsilcilerine itaati ve demokrasi arasında bir denge kurma mücadelesidir. Çalışmanın vardığı sonuç, sivil kontrolün oluşturulması ve sürdürülmesinin asla orduyu kısıtlamaya yönelik, tek taraflı bir hareket olmadığıdır. Sivil kontrol, orduyu genel ulusal kurumlar sistemiyle bütünleştirmek, sorumluluk alanını mümkün olduğunca açık bir şekilde tarif etmek amacına yönelik bir karşılıklı taviz vermedir. Bir demokraside sağlıklı sivil kontrol tesis etmek için kesin anayasal güvencelerin yanında yerleşmiş, kurumsallaşmış demokratik gelenekler de gereklidir.
  • Author: W. Arthur Lewis
  • Publication Date: 10-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Bilgi
  • Institution: Değişim Yayınları
  • Abstract: 1950'li yıllar boyunca azgelişmiş ülkeler iyi sayılabilecek durumdadır. Birleşmiş Milletler verileri, gayrisafi yurtiçi hasılanın (GDP), yıllık ortalama olarak, Latin Amerika'da yüzde 4.6 düzeyinde, (Japonya ve Çin Anakarası hariç) Uzak Doğu'da yüzde 4.2 düzeyinde, Güney Asya'da yüzde 5.2 düzeyinde ve Afrika'da yüzde 4.1 düzeyinde arttığını ortaya koymaktadır.3 '50'li yılların başında iktisatçılar, daha çok, söz konusu ülkelerin, yüzde 2'ler düzeyinde seyreden nüfus arıtışının üzerinde bir büyüme performansını mümkün kılacak gayreti gösterip gösteremeyecekleri ile ilgilenmiştir. Yüzde 4'ün üzerine çıkan büyüme performansı, sermaye, girişimcilik, nitelik ve dış ticaret olgularının sanıldığı gibi aşılması zor engeller olmadığını göstermiştir. Bu çalışmada, büyüme sorunu incelenirken kullanılan birtakım kavramlardan istifade edilerek, yukarıdaki unsurların her biri gözden geçirilecektir.
  • Author: Fatma Yurttaş, Cihan Selek Öz
  • Publication Date: 10-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Bilgi
  • Institution: Değişim Yayınları
  • Abstract: Nuray Mert'in, “Laiklik Tartışmasına Kavramsal Bir Bakış” başlıklı kitabı, kendisinin de belirttiği gibi, 1992 yılında tamamladığı doktora çalışmasının bazı değişiklikler yapılarak Türkçeye çevrilmiş halidir.
  • Author: Kemal İnat
  • Publication Date: 09-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Bilgi
  • Institution: Değişim Yayınları
  • Abstract: Almanya‟nın dünyanın en büyük ekonomik güçlerinden biri olması bu ülkenin dış politikasının yönünü dünya açısından önemli kılmaktadır. Bu ülkenin geçmişte gücünü yayılmacı politika yönünde kullanma konusunda sabıkalı bir geçmişe sahip olması bu önemi daha da artırmaktadır. Bu makalede 1990 yılındaki birleşme sonrasında kendisini sınırlayan son bağlardan da kurtulan Almanya‟nın yeniden eski güç politikasına (Machtpolitik) dönüp dönmeyeceği konusundaki tartışmalar ele alınmıştır.
  • Author: Muhittin Ataman
  • Publication Date: 09-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Bilgi
  • Institution: Değişim Yayınları
  • Abstract: This study elaborates change in Turkish foreign policy since the end of the Cold War. This change was explained with interdependence and diversification concepts. Four main factors play a significant role in change of Turkish foreign policy orientation. After a brief introduction, these four factors (historical heritage and cultural factors, geographical location, politi-cal preferences, economic needs) were analyzed. In the second section of the study, interdependence and diversification in Turkish foreign policy are ana-lyzed based on these factors. Due to economic needs and political prefe-rences, Turkey entered into an integration process with the West. As a result of historical and cultural factors, it has been pursuing an active policy to-wards the Muslim world. Similarly, it initiated cooperation in many issue areas with the Turkic world due to strong ethnic and cultural connections. Finally, it developed close relations with regional countries due to historical heritage and geographical connections.
  • Political Geography: Turkey
  • Author: Veysel Ayhan
  • Publication Date: 09-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Bilgi
  • Institution: Değişim Yayınları
  • Abstract: Kuveyt'in Osmanlı İmparatorluğu dönemindeki idari statüsü ve sınırları Irak-Kuveyt ilişkilerinde sürekli sorun olarak gündeme gelmiştir. Irak'ın kurulduğu günden itibaren üzerinde hak iddia ettiği ve 1990 Ağustosunda da işgal ettiği Kuveyt'in bir Irak toprağı olduğu sorunsalı Soğuk Savaş sonrası dönemde ilk önce Kuveyt ve ardından da Irak işgaline giden sürecin nedenini oluşturmaktadır. 1990 öncesi dönemde Türkiye, Irak ve Kuveyt arasındaki tarihsel hak iddialarına doğrudan müdahil olmak istememiştir. Ancak Irak'ın Kuveyt'i işgal girişimi Kuveyt politikasında bir kırılma yaratmış ve Türkiye, Kuveyt'in bağımsızlığının korunmasında doğrudan taraf olmuştur. Cumhurbaşkanı Özal'ın işgal karşıtı politikaları, Türkiye-Kuveyt ilişkilerinin olumsuz tarihsel önyargıların etkisinden kurtulmasına yol açmıştır. Ancak, Irak işgali sonrası ortaya çıkan yeni koşullar Türkiye ile Kuveyt arasında çatışan çıkarlar ve yeni işbirliği olanakları ortaya çıkarmıştır. İşgale destek veren Kuveyt'in temel dış politika önceliği Irak'ın tehdit unsuru olmaktan çıkartılmasıdır. Dolayısıyla Kuveyt, Irak'ın etnik ve mezhep temelinde federe devletlere bölünmesinden, Iraklı Kürtlerin siyasal ve askeri olarak Bağdat'ı kontrol etmesine kadar birçok alternatifi gündemde tutmaktadır. Türkiye ise Irak'ın bağımsızlığının, siyasi birliğinin ve toprak bütünlüğünün korunması taraftarıdır. Kuveyt'in kısa ve uzun dönemli Irak politikalarının Türkiye-Kuveyt ilişkilerine etkisini analiz etmeyi amaçlayan bu çalışma aynı zamanda tarihsel geri planı göz ardı etmeden Türkiye-Kuveyt ilişkilerinin geleceğine dönük bir projeksiyon sunmayı da hedeflemektedir.
  • Political Geography: Turkey, Kuwait
  • Author: Sadık Ünay
  • Publication Date: 09-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Bilgi
  • Institution: Değişim Yayınları
  • Abstract: Küreselleşme yazınında ulus devletin sosyoekonomik kalkınma ve sınaî-teknolojik dönüşüm süreçlerinde oynayabileceği rol üzerinde yapılan temel tartışmalardan yola çıkılan bu çalışmada DTÖ rejimi bağlamında küresel yönetişim mimarisinin kamusal stratejik aktivizm girişimlerine etkisi incelenmiştir. “Bilgi ekonomisi” ya da yeni ekonominin başlıca sektörleri bağlamında OECD hükümetlerinin sanayi-teknoloji yönetişimi, risk sermayesi sağlanması, kamu alımları ve proje takipçiliği ile stratejik ihracat politikaları aracılığıyla ulusal girişimcilerini destekleyebilmek adına attıkları adımlara dikkat çekilmiştir. İncelenen tekno-ticaret politikalarının küreselleşme yazınında neoliberal eğilimli yazarlarca vurgulanan “marjinalleşme” süreçlerinden ziyade ulusal otoritelerin belli politika önceliklerine yoğunlaşarak daha dar kapsamlı, seçici, rafine ve sonuç alıcı müdahale formlarını tercih ettikleri vurgulanmıştır. Ardından gelişmekte olan ülkelerin bilgi ekonomisine geçiş noktasında tecrübe ettikleri sıkıntılara dikkat çekilmiş ve bu ülkelerin çok daha proaktif girişimlere ihtiyaçları olduğuna işaret edilmiştir. Bu bağlamda Türkiye gibi belli bir sanayi-teknoloji altyapısına sahip gelişmekte olan ülkeler için “stratejik-aktif devlet” kavramsallaştırması geliştirilerek ekonomik diplomasi, geleneksel uluslararası ilişkiler, yerel eksenli sosyoekonomik kalkınma politikaları ve tekno-ticaret politikaları merkezinde stratejik aktivizme odaklanacak böyle bir siyasi tipolojinin taşıması gereken özellikler ortaya konulmuştur.
  • Political Geography: Turkey
  • Author: G. L. Kaminsky, C. M. Reinhart
  • Publication Date: 09-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Bilgi
  • Institution: Değişim Yayınları
  • Abstract: 2 Temmuz 1997 tarihinde Tayland Bahtı'nın devalüe edilmesinin ardından para ve menkul değerler piyasalarında, 1994 yılında Meksika Pesosu'nun devalüe edilmesinin ardından yaşanan “tekila” etkisini fazlasıyla aşan ölçülerde bir dalgalanma meydana gelmiştir. Kriz, ilk olarak, Doğu Asya'nın diğer ülkelerine bir dizi devalüasyon ve borsa çöküşü biçiminde yansımıştır. Sorunun derinlik kazanması ile birlikte, Hong Kong ve Güney Kore dahil, bölgedeki diğer ülkelerin para birimleri spekülatif baskılara maruz kalmıştır. Öte yandan kriz bölge dışına da taşmıştır. Arjantin, Brezilya ve Rusya gibi ülkelerin hisse senedi piyasalarında sert düşüşler yaşanmış ve ulusal para birimlerine dönük spekülatif saldırılar olmuştur. Döviz piyasalarında durum düzeldikçe, Tayland ve Güney Kore'de olduğu gibi, ülkelerin önemli bir bölümünde bankacılık sorunları, belki bunun da ötesinde büyük ölçekli bankacılık krizleri ortaya çıkmıştır.
  • Author: Mehmet Dalar
  • Publication Date: 09-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Bilgi
  • Institution: Değişim Yayınları
  • Abstract: 2 Temmuz 1997 tarihinde Tayland Bahtı'nın devalüe edilmesinin ardından para ve menkul değerler piyasalarında, 1994 yılında Meksika Pesosu'nun devalüe edilmesinin ardından yaşanan “tekila” etkisini fazlasıyla aşan ölçülerde bir dalgalanma meydana gelmiştir. Kriz, ilk olarak, Doğu Asya'nın diğer ülkelerine bir dizi devalüasyon ve borsa çöküşü biçiminde yansımıştır. Sorunun derinlik kazanması ile birlikte, Hong Kong ve Güney Kore dahil, bölgedeki diğer ülkelerin para birimleri spekülatif baskılara maruz kalmıştır. Öte yandan kriz bölge dışına da taşmıştır. Arjantin, Brezilya ve Rusya gibi ülkelerin hisse senedi piyasalarında sert düşüşler yaşanmış ve ulusal para birimlerine dönük spekülatif saldırılar olmuştur. Döviz piyasalarında durum düzeldikçe, Tayland ve Güney Kore'de olduğu gibi, ülkelerin önemli bir bölümünde bankacılık sorunları, belki bunun da ötesinde büyük ölçekli bankacılık krizleri ortaya çıkmıştır.
  • Political Geography: Europe, Turkey, France
  • Author: Clifton van der Linden
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: The Journal of International Law and International Relations
  • Institution: Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto
  • Abstract: In its opinion regarding the legality of the secession of Quebec, the Supreme Court of Canada observed that 'the process of [state] recognition, once considered to be an exercise of pure sovereign discretion, has come to be associated with legal norms.' Mindful of the principle of effectivity, the Court was cautious not to overstate the bounds of legal authority in matters of secession. Nevertheless, the acknowledgement of international law as a constitutive element of state behaviour in matters relating to secession marks a significant departure from conventional realpolitik accounts, wherein 'successful revolution begets its own legality.'
  • Political Geography: Canada
  • Author: Antje Wiener, Uwe Puetter
  • Publication Date: 01-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: The Journal of International Law and International Relations
  • Institution: Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto
  • Abstract: What actors make of norms matters, in particular, in situations of crisis when the contextual conditions for norm interpretation are enhanced. That is, situations of crisis add an additional factor of pressure next to the conditions of normative contingency and moving the social practice of governance. beyond the boundaries of modern states. The addition of time requires fast decisions thus leaving little room for deliberation about a norm's meaning. Contrary to the expectation that based on an increasing constitutional quality in beyond‐the‐state contexts, actors can build on and refer to a set of formally and informally shared principles for information and guidance in designing common action and policies, we hold that norm interpretation in international relations is challenged by the absence of cultural background information. If this observation holds, it follows that the often observed constitutional quality beyond the state which includes the formalization of the role of international norms through treaties and agreements, the dense web of international negotiation forums and enhanced possibilities of iterated interaction in the global realm is not necessarily conducive to the shared interpretation of norms in an international setting. While this constitutional quality has been acknowledged and reflected by the concepts of disaggregated network governance, a global community of courts, or as sites of struggle, paradoxically, the very process of norm proliferation and the increasing acknowledgement of the power of norms in international relations and decisions that are taken bring the contested nature of norms to the fore—thus demanding a fresh look at norm applications. Research on norms, therefore, needs to better understand the inherently contested quality of norms that stems from and is closely interrelated with the very processes of norm application. A key theme throughout this special issue is that theoretical approaches to the study of norms need to generate a more encompassing and substantive definition of norms, allowing researchers to study and understand them in a context‐specific manner. We argue that only such an approach can account for the role of contestation as an integral part of the processes by which specific policy options are derived. This poses both a conceptual and empirical challenge.
  • Author: Rashid I. Khalidi
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: THIS SPECIAL ISSUE of JPS celebrates the work of the renowned anthropologist Rosemary Sayigh, a pioneer in the field of refugee studies and the first scholar to emphasize the signal importance of Palestinian refugees in the revival of Palestinian nationalism in the 1960s-notably in her pathbreaking Palestinians: From Peasants to Revolutionaries, published thirty years ago. At the same time, Rosemary was one of the first researchers to examine issues of gender in Palestinian and Arab society, as her reliance on women as resources for her investigations revealed to her-and through her, to generations of readers- the crucial role played by women in the social and economic structure of Palestinian refugee camps and Palestinian political life.
  • Political Geography: Israel, Palestine, Arabia
  • Author: Beshara Doumani, Mayssun Soukarieh
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: Rosemary Sayigh-writer, activist, mentor, and ethical compass-has arguably made a greater impact on Palestinian studies than most scholars over the past generation. Palestinian refugees in Lebanon; women under occupation; oral history of the Nakba; gender and politics; memory and identity; culture and resistance; the political responsibility of the researcher-these are but some of the lines of inquiry she has pioneered. Starting with her classic book, The Palestinians: From Peasants to Revolutionaries; A People's History, published thirty years ago, she has become the unofficial mentor of large numbers of PhD students specializing in the above fields. "Unofficial" because, although she has been an indispensable resource for emerging scholars, she remains an outsider to institutions of higher education. She has never held a permanent academic position and was largely shunned by universities and research centers in Lebanon, the country where she has lived for more than fifty years. This special issue of the Journal of Palestine Studies (JPS) in honor of Rosemary Sayigh is richly deserved and long overdue.
  • Topic: Politics
  • Political Geography: Israel, Palestine, Arabia
  • Author: Mayssun Soukarieh
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: This interview is part of a longer conversation that independent researcher Mayssun Soukarieh conducted with Rosemary Sayigh in Beirut during the summer of 2008. Sayigh, an anthropologist, oral historian, and researcher, was born in Birmingham in the United Kingdom and moved to Beirut in 1953, where she married the Palestinian economist Yusif Sayigh. She earned her master's degree from the American University of Beirut (AUB) in 1970 and was awarded a PhD from Hull University in Yorkshire in 1994. Since coming to Beirut fifty-six years ago, Sayigh has dedicated her life to writing and advocating for the Palestinians in Lebanon and elsewhere. She is the author of two groundbreaking books: Palestinians: From Peasants to Revolutionaries; A People's History (Zed Books, 1979) and Too Many Enemies: The Palestinian Experience in Lebanon (Zed Books, 1993). Although these conversations focused on Sayigh's scholarly work rather than her personal history, it became clear that the two are inextricably linked.
  • Topic: War
  • Political Geography: United Kingdom, America, Palestine, Lebanon
  • Author: Penny Johnson
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: Referencing the "stereotypes of self" identified by Rosemary Sayigh in the life stories of Palestinian camp women in Lebanon who had lived through the Palestinian resistance, the author focuses on the narratives of two women in Ramallah's Am'ari refugee camp since the outbreak of the al-Aqsa intifada to reflect on the Palestinian present. Though the women-and their goals and struggles-could not be more different, their narratives reveal significant shifts in self-representation that reflect both the impact of post-Oslo political realities and the new (unattainable) aspirations fueled by satellite television images and Ramallah caf´e culture. The narratives also reflect, in very different ways, the national crisis, the impotence of Palestinian political groups and institutions, and the erosion of solidarities
  • Political Geography: Israel, Palestine, Lebanon
  • Author: Stephanie Latte Abdallah
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: This article focuses on conjugal love as an articulated, lived emotion; on relationships between spouses within the context of the family; and on how these emotions and relations have changed over time in Palestinian refugee camps in Jordan. Based on interviews with four generations of Palestinian camp women, the article charts evolving marital patterns and attitudes toward marriage in relation to changing political circumstances and diverse influences. Particular emphasis is given to the third generation and the emergence of individualization of choice and its consequences. The influence of the family and the role of protection in the formation of conjugal bonds are also addressed.
  • Topic: Security, Politics
  • Political Geography: Europe, Middle East, Jordan
  • Author: Falestin Naïli
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: This article deals with the memory narratives of women from the West Bank village of Artas who were displaced as a result of the 1967 war and are today living in working-class neighborhoods of eastern Amman. Imbued with nostalgia, their narratives extol the values that had governed life in the village before their dispersal, values that have proved to be important for survival in exile. The "peasant past" remembered by these women is examined in the dual context of the history of Artas and the migratory itineraries of the women, many of whom were displaced for a second time during the Gulf War of 1990-91.
  • Topic: War
  • Political Geography: Palestine
  • Author: Diana Allan
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: This article revisits Rosemary Sayigh's theory of "culture as resistance" and considers how primordial attachments of kin and village, and by extension nation, in Shatila camp are being reconfigured by deepening poverty and provisionality. Shifting analytical attention away from the discursive continuities of nationalism toward the contingencies of everyday material practice in its local environment, the article examines how dynamically evolving networks of solidarity are reconstituting traditional structures of kinship and political belonging, broadly conceived, and producing new forms of agency and economic subjectivity for camp women.
  • Topic: Security, Politics
  • Political Geography: Lebanon
  • Author: Camille Mansour
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: This essay looks at the Gaza war of winter 2008-2009 within its broader politico-military context. At the political level, Israel's post- 2005 disengagement policies and initiatives with regard to Gaza (and Egypt) and their implications relative to the future of the West Bank are emphasized. Militarily, in examining the background and objectives of the war, the author gives particular importance to the testing of lessons drawn from the past, especially the summer 2006 war on Lebanon, in the aim of regaining a kind of "Dahiya" deterrence based on reprisals against civilians rather than on battlefield victory.
  • Topic: War
  • Political Geography: Israel, Egypt
  • Author: Elena N. Hogan
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: This personal account describes aspects of closure, siege, and daily life witnessed in the Gaza Strip from May to July 2009, with emphasis on the impact of the blockade in the wake of Operation Cast Lead. As an international worker made to grapple with increasingly complicated Israeli bureaucracy, but "allowed" access into Gaza for purposes of humanitarian aid, the author describes her impressions of the current Gazan situation as an instance of isolation whose plight is increasingly hidden from the gaze of the outside world.
  • Topic: Security
  • Political Geography: Israel, Gaza
  • Author: Rochelle A. Davis
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: Governing Gaza: Bureaucracy, Authority, and the Work of Rule provides a fascinating and sophisticated examination of the foreign governing systems enacted by civil servants in the Gaza Strip during the periods of the British Mandate over Palestine (1917-48) and the Egyptian administration of the Gaza Strip (1948-67). The mainstay of Ilana Feldman's book is what she calls "the tenuous domain of the everyday that was never entirely lost" in the "ruptures of Palestinian history" (p. 2). Feldman is both an anthropologist and a historian, and thus her book, an "ethnographic history," examines both the "government at work" and what it meant for people to "work for the government." Her analysis encompasses historical material currently held in archives in four different countries, enriched with oral histories of civil servants, and made sense of by her own experiences of living in Gaza amid the modern-day bureaucracy of the Palestinian Authority (PA) and the Israeli occupation authorities.
  • Topic: Government
  • Political Geography: Gaza, Egypt
  • Author: Marcy Jane Knopf-Newman
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: As the reconstruction of Nahr al-Barid refugee camp in northern Lebanon is halted once again, this time due to the discovery of an archaeological site, twelve thousand Palestinians from the camp have taken to the streets in protest. The remaining nineteen thousand refugees continue to reside in eleven other camps in Lebanon, unable to return two years after the Lebanese army destroyed it. The struggle for these refugees has shifted, albeit temporarily, from the right of return to Palestine to that of return to the camp.
  • Topic: Security
  • Political Geography: Israel, Gaza
  • Author: Samera Esmeir
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: Little is written about Palestinian law and society, and Tobias Kelly's Law, Violence and Sovereignty among West Bank Palestinians comes as an ethnographic and theoretical contribution to this small and growing field. Focusing on the everyday application of the law and life of West Bank workers, Kelly, an anthropologist who has conducted long-term fieldwork in the occupied Palestinian territories, exposes the abstract nature of regimes of power. While these regimes are often understood as suspending the law and legitimizing violence, they emerge in Kelly's analysis as having created an intimate relationship between legal orders of rights and violence. The book focuses on legal practice, rather than legal doctrine, and inquires into how law, rights claims, and spaces of jurisdictions are mobilized in the village where Kelly conducted his fieldwork (given the fictional name of Bayt Hajjar). Instead of viewing rights talk as alien and imposed from above and reducing all frameworks of moral and political reference to that of the law, the book reveals the many meanings acquired by the law in its everyday coexistence with other significant relationships: "For the residents of Bayt Hajjar, rights claims do not emerge in an abstract legal universe, but are created in the context of ongoing, morally charged relationships, involving elements of village and national solidarity. The result is a profoundly ambivalent attitude to legal claims".
  • Political Geography: Palestine, Arabia, United Nations, Lebanon
  • Author: Lenni Brenner
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: Hillel Cohen must be congratulated for the quality of Army of Shadows: Palestinian Collaboration with Zionism, 1917-1948. This accurate and finely detailed book will be assured a permanent place in Palestinian nationalist historiography. While Cohen is a declared Zionist, there are no signs that his politics distorted his scholarship, which is based on declassified Zionist reports, British colonial archives, and captured Arab documents. He carefully describes how Zionists took advantage of "the fissures that cut through Palestinian society-between villagers, city dwellers, and Bedouin, between the rival families of the urban elite, between classes, between ethnic and religious groups" (p. 7) to defeat the right-wing Palestinian nationalist leadership of that era.
  • Political Geography: Palestine
  • Author: Finbarr Barry Flood
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: This short, engaging book represents half a century of reflection on what is at once the most familiar and enigmatic of Islamic monuments by its preeminent modern biographer. Combining formal analysis with epigraphic and textual exegesis, and drawing upon recent archaeological discoveries in and around Jerusalem, Oleg Grabar constructs a broad context for his diachronic account of the monument.
  • Political Geography: Arabia
  • Author: Geremy Forman
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: Land Expropriation in Israel: Law, Culture and Society is one of the first monographs in a primarily article-based body of literature that examines the evolution of Israeli land law and its impact on Israeli society. Written by a leading Israeli legal historian and former independent academic advisor to the Israeli Interministerial Committee on Reform of Land Expropriation Law, the book is unique in that it does not focus on the state's mass appropriation of Arab-owned land over the years. Instead, it explores the history of land expropriation for "public purposes," a mechanism that has been applied to Israel's Jewish and Palestinian citizens alike, and which most scholars agree played a relatively minor role in appropriating Arab land. In this way, the book compels readers to view expropriation from Arabs and Jews as part of the same issue, an approach that ultimately sheds important new light on the subject.
  • Political Geography: Israel, Arabia
  • Author: Sami Shalom Chetrit
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: Michael R. Fischbach's fascinating research portrays in a chronological fashion, and in parallel to the Arab-Israeli conflict, the process by which the Jews of the Muslim world lost not only their property but also, most importantly, the individual right to claim compensation for their loss in their relocation to Israel. Israel, with the collaboration of government-sponsored organizations of Jews from the Arab and Muslim world (mainly the World Organization of Jews from Arab Countries), has silenced property claims and held these as bargaining chips in future negotiations with the Palestinians over the 1948 Palestinian refugee issue. In his previous books, Fischbach, a history professor at Randolph-Macon College, had addressed Palestinian refugee and dispossession issues.
  • Political Geography: Arabia
  • Author: Marnia Lazreg
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: Yuval Ginbar's book, Why Not Torture Terrorists? Moral, Practical, and Legal As-pects of the 'Ticking Bomb' Justification of Torture, critically examines the morality of the "ticking bomb" scenario, a fictitious case frequently used by advocates of torture to justify its use under exceptional circumstances "to save lives." Ginbar is an Israeli human rights activist with legal training. The book was first written as a dissertation and incorporates articles that originally appeared in human rights publications. Structured around twenty overlapping chapters, it focuses on two case studies, Israel and the post-9/11 United States, although it also refers to a wide array of cases and methods of torture drawn from Latin America, Africa, and Turkey, among others.
  • Political Geography: Israel, Arabia
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: This section aims to give readers a glimpse of how the Arab world views current events that affect Palestinians and the Arab-Israeli conflict by presenting a selection of cartoons from al-Hayat, the most widely distributed mainstream daily in the Arab world. The cartoons are by Habib Haddad. JPS is grateful to al-Hayat for permission to reprint its material.
  • Political Geography: Arabia
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: This section includes articles by Israeli journalists and commentators that have been selected for their frank reporting, insightful analysis, or interesting perspectives on events, developments, or trends in Israel and the occupied territories. It in no way seeks to be representative of the Israeli press in general; it is intended simply to provide JPS readers with reporting not readily available in the U.S. media.
  • Political Geography: United States
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: This small sample of photos, selected from hundreds viewed by JPS, aims to convey a sense of the situation on the ground in the occupied territories during the quarter.
  • Political Geography: Israel, Palestine
  • Author: Michele K. Esposito
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: The Quarterly Update is a summary of bilateral, multilateral, regional, and international events affecting the Palestinians and the future of the peace process. More than 100 print, wire, television, and online sources providing U.S., Israeli, Arab, and international independent and government coverage of unfolding events are surveyed to compile the Quarterly Update. The most relevant sources are cited in JPS's Chronology section, which tracks events day by day.
  • Political Geography: United States, Israel, Palestine, Arabia
  • Author: Geoffrey Aronson
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: This section covers items-reprinted articles, statistics, and maps-pertaining to Israeli settlement activities in the Gaza Strip and the West Bank, including East Jerusalem, and the Golan Heights. Unless otherwise stated, the items have been written by Geoffrey Aronson for this section or drawn from material written by him for Report on Israeli Settlement in the Occupied Territories (hereinafter Settlement Report), a Washington-based bimonthly newsletter published by the Foundation for Middle East Peace. JPS is grateful to the foundation for permission to draw on its material.
  • Political Geography: Washington, Jerusalem
  • Author: Brian Wood, Paul Costic
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: The Congressional Monitor provides summaries of all relevant bills and resolutions (joint, concurrent, and simple) introduced during the previous session of Congress that mention, even briefly, either Palestine or Israel. Speeches are not included. The format of this Monitor provides an overview of U.S. legislation related to the Palestine issue and helps to identify the major themes of legislation, its initiators, their priorities, the range of their concerns, and their attitudes toward the regional actors. Material in this compilation is drawn from www.thomas.loc.gov, where readers can also find a detailed primer on the legislative process entitled "How Our Laws Are Made."
  • Political Geography: Palestine
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: The report, requested by the Human Rights Council at its special session convened 9 January 2009 during Operation Cast Lead (OCL), focuses on the international law and human rights issues raised by Israel's sustained military assault on Gaza conducted from 27 December 2008 to 18 January 2009. Like earlier reports by the current Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Palestinian occupied territories, the American jurist Richard Falk, it is not based on an actual visit to Gaza: since his appointment in March 2008, Falk has been twice refused entry into Israel in his official capacity (most recently during OCL, when he was deported after detention at Ben-Gurion airport).
  • Political Geography: Israel
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: International Crisis Group's (ICG) 50- page report in the wake of OCL examines the war's toll and fallout for Gaza, the West Bank, and Israel, as well as prospects for a lasting cease-fire, Gazan reconstruction, and intra-Palestinian reconciliation in light of current realities. The excerpts below focus on Egypt's role, both in Gaza and with regard to the "regional cold war." Footnotes have been omitted for space considerations. The full report can be found online at www.crisisgroup.org.
  • Political Geography: Washington, Jerusalem, Brussels
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: Hamas did not possess the military arsenalmany had suggested; neither Iran nor any other regional player was capable of displacing Egypt as the central mediator (between Israel and Hamas, as well as among Palestinians); and, to a degree, Iranian support hurt the Islamist movement as much as it helped, by allowing detractors to paint it as alien to the Sunni Arab body politic.
  • Political Geography: Arabia
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: During the reporting period the Israeli authorities implemented a number of measures, which have eased the flow of Palestinian traffic on some of the access routes into four main cities: Nablus, Hebron, Tulkarm, and Ramallah. These measures included the removal of permit requirements for vehicles entering Nablus city; the opening of two junctions allowing more direct access to Hebron city; the removal of one checkpoint on the southern route into Tulkarm city; and the opening of a "fabric of life" alternative road easing access to Ramallah city from the west.
  • Political Geography: Jerusalem
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: Hasan Nasrallah devoted his usual Friday televised address to responding head-on to the Egyptian government's dramatic announcement two days earlier of a Hizballah network operating in Egypt to spread Shi'i ideas and prepare hostile operations threatening public security. While forcefully denying the charges asmade, the speech is important for its confirmation, with detail, of Hizballah's involvement in transporting weapons and ammunition across the border into Gaza the month before Operation Cast Lead. Nasrallah's summary of his party's policies with regard to the Arab countries is also noteworthy. (See section "The Regional Cold War" in Doc. A2 above for International Crisis Group's analysis of the Egyptian-Hizballah exchange.) The speech, carried by Hizballah's al-Manar television, was translated in full by BBC Monitoring Middle East and made available by BBC World Monitoring on 12 April 2009.
  • Political Geography: Washington, Paris, London, Palestine, Jerusalem
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: Khalid Mishal!s interview with the New York Times was his first to a U.S. news organization in more than a year. The excerpts published by the Times on 5 May were taken from a five-hour interview conducted in Arabic over two days at his house in Damascus. Although the excerpts do not cover much ground that was not covered in Mishal's long interview with JPS in March 2008 (see the two-part Mishal interview in JPS 147-48), they are interesting in that they are clearly directed at the new Obama administration. The full excerpts of the Times interview can be found online at www.nytimes.com.
  • Political Geography: New York, Palestine, Arabia
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: Less than a month after Operation Cast Lead (OCL) ended, an Israeli peace activist who had occasionally served as an unofficial emissary between Israel and Hamas revealed that ten days before the operation's launch the Olmert government had rejected Hamas's back-channel offer to negotiate the renewal of the interrupted cease-fire, as well as a prisoner exchange involving captured Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit. Gershon Baskin, co-founder and director of the Jerusalem-based Israel/ Palestine Center for Research and Information, wrote a detailed account of the episode in the Jerusalem Post, concluding that it gave the lie to the government's claim that OCL was a "war of no choice." The full text of this article can be found online at www.jpost.com.
  • Political Geography: Palestine
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: Avigdor Lieberman, leader of the rightwing Yisrael Beitainu ("Israel Is Our Home") party, was appointed foreign minister in March 2009 in Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's Likud government coalition, which formed nearly six weeks after the Knesset elections of 10 February 2009. Lieberman, who ran under the slogan "no loyalty, no citizenship"- demanding that Arab citizens of Israel pledge allegiance to the Jewish state or be expelled and calling for the "annihilation" of Hamas-won an unprecedented fifteen seats, beating out Labor to become Israel's third-largest party in the Knesset. Lieberman, a settler and immigrant from the former Soviet Union, caused a stir with his first speech as foreign minister, in which he declared the road map to be the sole document binding Israel to its pledges post-Oslo. The full text of the speech can be found online at www.mfa.gov.il.
  • Political Geography: Palestine
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: The Israel Project (TIP), a pro-Israel media consulting firm "devoted to educating the press and the public about Israel while promoting security, freedom, and peace," commissioned Republican pollster and political language expert Frank Luntz to craft a language strategy for "visionary leaders who are on the front lines of fighting the media war for Israel" to talk to Americans with the aim of "winning the hearts and minds of the public." Luntz's first Global Language Dictionary for TIP was published in 2003; the 2009 Global Language Dictionary is the result of revisions based on research conducted in 2008.
  • Political Geography: America, Israel
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: The following are excerpts from a speech by Lt. Gen. Keith Dayton, the U.S. security coordinator (USSC) to the Palestinian Authority (PA), whose rare on-therecord address to the Washington Institute for Near East Policy (WINEP) was closely followed by observers of the Palestine- Israel conflict. Dayton has served as USSC since 2005 and recently accepted another two-year term.
  • Political Geography: Israel, Palestine
7866. Chronology
  • Author: Michele K. Esposito
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: This section is part 102 of a chronology begun in JPS 13, no. 3 (Spring 1984). Chronology dates reflect Eastern Standard Time (EST). For a more comprehensive overview of events related to the al-Aqsa intifada and of regional and international developments related to the peace process, see the Quarterly Update on Conflict and Diplomacy in this issue.
  • Political Geography: Palestine
  • Publication Date: 07-2009
  • Content Type: Journal Article
  • Journal: Journal of Palestine Studies
  • Institution: Institute for Palestine Studies
  • Abstract: This section lists articles and reviews of books relevant to Palestine and the Arab-Israeli conflict. Entries are classified under the following headings: Reference and General; History (through 1948) and Geography; Palestinian Politics and Society; Jerusalem; Israeli Politics, Society, and Zionism; Arab and Middle Eastern Politics; International Relations; Law; Military; Economy, Society, and Education; Literature, Arts, and Culture; Book Reviews; and Reports Received.
  • Political Geography: Middle East, Israel, Palestine, Arabia, Jerusalem